Content tagged “design”

  1. Answers to Questions About Performance — Google Developers — Medium

    Google’s Paul Lewis answers the same questions that Matt Gaunt received (and that I previously linked to). Paul’s focus on the user and their experience of our work resonates strongly with me and is something I harp on quite frequently.

    I think performance, accessibility, and security share some traits: they can’t be retro-fitted to a project, they’re often thankless tasks, and they’re only notable by their absence. They’re all, however, the bedrock of a good user experience, onto which you can layer high quality designs and interactions.

    Paul also cites one of my favorite documents, the W3C’s HTML Design Principles:

    In case of conflict, consider users over authors over implementors over specifiers over theoretical purity.

    Truth.

  2. Web Development is a Balancing Act — Medium

    Google Chrome Developer Advocate Matt Gaunt publicly answers some Web performance-related questions he received. Many of the questions have to do with frameworks, a topic of great interest to me.

    A slow website, no matter how it’s built, means someone didn’t notice, didn’t care or couldn’t fix the problem. That doesn’t mean the framework or tools used to build it is the problem, it could be the way those tools have been used.

    It could also be that the chosen tool isn’t the best solution to the problem at hand.

  3. How Changing WebFonts Made Rubygems.org 10x Faster

    Nate Berkopec’s article is chock full of useful information, but I was particularly taken by his framing of a developer’s job (emphasis his):

    As developers, our job isn’t to tell the designers “Hey, you’re dumb for including over 500KB of WebFonts in your design!”. That’s not their job. As performance-minded web developers, our job is to deliver the designer’s vision in the most performant way possible.

    Equally interesting, but more technically-focused, is the rundown of how Google Fonts takes advantage of the unicode-range property to deliver smaller fonts.

    The unicode-range property describes what characters the font supports. […] By telling the browser what characters the font supports, the browser can look at the page, note what characters the page uses, and then only download the fonts it needs to display the characters actually on the page.

    Brilliant. I switched to serving fonts from Google and trimmed 45–70 kilobytes from my homepage. Your mileage may vary, but… not bad.

  4. Mobile Web Stress: Understanding the neurological impact of poor performance

    Slides from Tammy Everts’ 2013 presentation on the neurological effects of poor performance on our websites’ visitors reveal some startling facts. Right out of the gates, Tammy cites a 2010 EEG study of users navigating a site on a connection throttled from 5MB to 2MB. The study found that participants had to concentrate up to 50% harder and reported a negative brand association afterward.

  5. Imagining the Web of Things with Stephanie Rieger and Jonas Sicking | The Web Ahead

    I find myself with IoT talking about progressive enhancement all the time, even though it’s a Web thing, but it makes even more sense. Really, it should be the thing it was designed to be first and then the smarts layered on top.

    Stephanie Rieger on a recent episode of The Web Ahead podcast, speaking with Jen Simmons about designing network-connected physical devices—ahem the Internet of Things—with the philosophy of progressive enhancement baked in. Sure, you could build a Web-connected light switch, but if it isn’t first a well-designed light switch, you’ve missed the mark.

  6. Visions of the Future

    Imagination is our window into the future. At NASA/JPL we strive to be bold in advancing the edge of possibility so that someday, with the help of new generations of innovators and explorers, these visions of the future can become a reality. As you look through these images of imaginative travel destinations, remember that you can be an architect of the future.

    This collection of WPA-style travel posters from NASA/JPL appeals to my interests.

  7. Bloodlines

    Bloodlines

    Taken on .

  8. Notes from “Designing for Performance”

    If you build websites for a living or work with people who do, stop what you’re doing and get yourself (or your team) a copy of this book.

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  9. Fifteen Years of “A Dao of Web Design”

    This week marks the fifteenth anniversary of one of the seminal articles on Web design: John Allsopp’s, “A Dao of Web Design.”

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  10. Designing Experience Layers

    Wherein I rattle on about the Web, content-first design, and progressive enhancement.

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  11. What do you value?

    A recent interview with a candidate got me thinking about values.

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  12. The Web Is Cake

    Or, more specifically, web pages are cake. Here's why.

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  13. swissted

    swissted is an ongoing project by graphic designer mike joyce, owner of stereotype design in new york city. drawing from his love of punk rock and swiss modernism, two movements that have (almost) nothing to do with one another, mike has redesigned vintage punk, hardcore, and indie rock show flyers into international typographic style posters. each design is set in berthold akzidenz grotesk medium, all lowercase. many of these posters are now available for sale in three different sizes at print-process. every single one of these shows actually happened.

  14. Fluid Grid System

    A web grid system designed by Joseph Silvashy and New Gold Leaf that allows designers to use the screen real estate on large monitors and retain great design on smaller ones. The Fluid Grid System combines the principals of the typographic grid and a baseline grid into one resolution-independent framework.

  15. Ignorance, Mockups, Bliss, and Markup

    In this article for ADCMW's FullBleed, I interview several well-known web designers and get their thoughts on the controversial topic of designing in the browser.

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  16. Interactive Sketching Notation - linowski.ca

    The interactive sketching notation is an emerging visual language which affords the representation of interface states and event-based user actions. Through a few simple and standardized rules, what the user sees (drawn in greys and blacks) and does (drawn in red) are unified into a coherent sketching system. This unification of both interface and use, intends to enable designers to tell more powerful stories of interaction.

  17. The myth of the page fold: evidence from user testing | cxpartners

    As web professionals, we all know that the concept of the page fold being an impenetrable barrier for users is a myth. Over the last 6 years we’ve watched over 800 user testing sessions between us and on only 3 occasions have we seen the page fold as a barrier to users getting to the content they want.

    In this article we’re going to break down the page fold myth and give some tips to ensure content below the fold gets seen.

  18. A List Apart: Articles: The Wisdom of Community

    It’s one of the most important concepts on the web today—perhaps the most important for social media—but it’s one of the least understood. When James Surowiecki wrote The Wisdom of Crowds in 2004, he explored the stock market and other classic social psychology examples, but “web 2.0” was still nascent. It’s time to connect his ideas to the social web, where they can reach their full potential.

  19. Function Web Design & Development [ Blog ] » How to Spot Quality within Web Design: Examples & Tips

    Quality is a word that a lot of people like to use when describing their web design services. But what is quality, how do you know if a design is quality or not. Well, I think that there’s quite a few ways to spot quality within web designs. Once you can see just what goes into making a quality web design, you can use the techniques to perfect your own style.

    I’ve put together a few pointers, and collected some examples to explain just how I look for quality within a website design.

  20. Politweets mixes Twitter and Election '08

    What if one could harness Twitter messages from the general populous based around a single topic or event? Enter Politweets.

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  21. Heading to Future of Web Design

    A whole bunch of the DC crew is heading up to New York City for the Future of Web Design conference next week.

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  22. Mixx goes beta

    I'm happy to announce that Mixx has gone beta and we're slowly letting people in to hammer away on the system.

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  23. circaVie launches

    CircaVie allows you to create visual timelines of events: your life, a vacation, etc. etc.

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  24. Reading Mode

    I just added a feature I'm rather fond of.

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  25. Ficlets

    The much-talked-about Project Ape Shirt has officially been born and christened Ficlets!

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  26. Catching up

    It's been a while since my last post.

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  27. Refresh DC site relaunch

    I'm happy to announce we've just relaunched the Refresh DC site.

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  28. Retro Theater

    The latest design over at the Zen Garden is sick.

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  29. Musings

    A new project at work has me diving deep into Microformats and XFN.

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  30. Recent goings-on

    Here's an abbreviated list of things that have been going on lately.

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  31. design fckr launches

    Alex Giron just launched a new site, design fckr.

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  32. Yahoo!'s Wii feature

    Yahoo! has a feature/mini-site devoted to the Nintendo Wii.

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  33. PJ Hyett

    Tavis found this yesterday while digging through some bookmarks and came across PJ Hyett's site.

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  34. Cindy Li redesigns

    Superfriend Cindy Li just launched a CSS-ified redesign of her personal site.

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  35. Rhythmic Uprising podcasts

    Ben Watkins and I are pleased to announce the launching of Rhythmic Uprising podcasts.

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  36. SXSW 2k6

    Casually late, it's a ridiculously brief wrap-up of this year's trip to Austin for SXSWi.

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  37. Grassroots and The New Web

    I recently handed over the reigns of the Global Youth Partnership for Africa site to their team.

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  38. Groupr

    Carbomb and I just finished up Groupr, a Flickr API app that lets you view the latest photos from your (or anyone else's) groups.

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  39. Refresh DC

    Refresh DC launched today.

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