Content tagged “UX”

  1. Answers to Questions About Performance — Google Developers — Medium

    Google’s Paul Lewis answers the same questions that Matt Gaunt received (and that I previously linked to). Paul’s focus on the user and their experience of our work resonates strongly with me and is something I harp on quite frequently.

    I think performance, accessibility, and security share some traits: they can’t be retro-fitted to a project, they’re often thankless tasks, and they’re only notable by their absence. They’re all, however, the bedrock of a good user experience, onto which you can layer high quality designs and interactions.

    Paul also cites one of my favorite documents, the W3C’s HTML Design Principles:

    In case of conflict, consider users over authors over implementors over specifiers over theoretical purity.

    Truth.

  2. Workspace

    Workspace

    Taken on .

  3. Interactive Sketching Notation - linowski.ca

    The interactive sketching notation is an emerging visual language which affords the representation of interface states and event-based user actions. Through a few simple and standardized rules, what the user sees (drawn in greys and blacks) and does (drawn in red) are unified into a coherent sketching system. This unification of both interface and use, intends to enable designers to tell more powerful stories of interaction.

  4. The myth of the page fold: evidence from user testing | cxpartners

    As web professionals, we all know that the concept of the page fold being an impenetrable barrier for users is a myth. Over the last 6 years we’ve watched over 800 user testing sessions between us and on only 3 occasions have we seen the page fold as a barrier to users getting to the content they want.

    In this article we’re going to break down the page fold myth and give some tips to ensure content below the fold gets seen.