Content tagged “UI”

  1. Extended Validation is Broken

    Today, I will demonstrate another issue with EV certificates: colliding entity names. Specifically, this site uses an EV certificate for “Stripe, Inc”, that was legitimately issued by Comodo. However, when you hear “Stripe, Inc”, you are probably thinking of the payment processor incorporated in Delaware. Here, though, you are talking to the “Stripe, Inc” incorporated in Kentucky. This problem can also appear when dealing with different countries.

    In this post, Ian outlines several Web security-related flaws in current-era browser user interface. Browsers, in an attempt to be clever, obfuscate several important pieces of information that might provide users with details about the people behind a particular website. On top of that, Ian demonstrates flaws in the cross-jurisdicitonal systems that allow for the coexistence of like-named but unrelated business entities.

    Browser vendors treat extended validation certificates as special cases, giving them visual priority over standard TLS certificates. The average user won’t know the difference—nor should they—when they see “Trusted Company X” highlighted in green in their browser’s URL bar. The expectation is that they’re actually viewing Trusted Company X’s website and not the website of some rando with a little bit of money to spare.

  2. Interactive Sketching Notation -

    The interactive sketching notation is an emerging visual language which affords the representation of interface states and event-based user actions. Through a few simple and standardized rules, what the user sees (drawn in greys and blacks) and does (drawn in red) are unified into a coherent sketching system. This unification of both interface and use, intends to enable designers to tell more powerful stories of interaction.

  3. The myth of the page fold: evidence from user testing | cxpartners

    As web professionals, we all know that the concept of the page fold being an impenetrable barrier for users is a myth. Over the last 6 years we’ve watched over 800 user testing sessions between us and on only 3 occasions have we seen the page fold as a barrier to users getting to the content they want.

    In this article we’re going to break down the page fold myth and give some tips to ensure content below the fold gets seen.