Content tagged “HTML”

  1. The HTML Tags Everybody Hated - The History of the Web

    Jay Hoffmann on the origins of the HTML Editorial Review Board (which would later become the HTML Working Group):

    In February of 1996, this new HTML ERB held their first meeting. The board had representation from all across the map, from browser vendors to software makers to standards advocates. And they each had a different idea of what HTML could do. What they needed was some uniform consensus. A common enemy to bring them together.

    Which brings us back to blink and marquee.

  2. Removing Headaches from Focus Management | Google Developers

    An exciting accessibility change is coming to Chrome 50. Google calls it “focus starting point” and it’s a small—but incredibly helpful—change to how their Web browser manages focused elements and tab order.

    If something has focus, it’s also the focus navigation start point, just like before. Also, just like before, if nothing else has set the focus navigation start point, then it will be the current document or, if available and supported, the currently active dialog. If we navigate to a page fragment like in the example above, that will now set the focus start point. Also, if we click any element on the page, regardless of whether it is focusable, that will now set the focus navigation start point. Finally, if the element which was the focus start point is removed from the DOM, its parent becomes the focus start point. No more focus whack-a-mole!

    As the article explains, prior to this change, focus management can be difficult when tabbing around and moving within a document (or into and out of modal dialog boxes). Take heed of the note in the article’s caveats section:

    Sequential focus navigation starting point is currently only supported in Chrome 50, Firefox, and Opera. Until it is supported in all browsers you’ll still need to add tabindex="-1" (and remove the focus outline) to your named anchor targets.

  3. Notes on Using ARIA in HTML

    This document is a practical guide for developers on how to add accessibility information to HTML elements using the Accessible Rich Internet Applications specification [WAI-ARIA-1.1], which defines a way to make Web content and Web applications more accessible to people with disabilities. This document demonstrates how to use WAI-ARIA in [HTML51], which especially helps with dynamic content and advanced user interface controls developed with Ajax, HTML, JavaScript, and related technologies.

  4. The makeup of the Open Web stack - destroy/dstorey

    The Open Web has never had as many capabilities as it has today. We’re seeing an explosion in new or updated specifications, and prototype and stable implementations to go with them. This blog post will look back as the platform we have had available (Called Open Web 0 here) and then looks forward at what we are beginning to get now and into the short and medium term future (which I’ve labelled Open Web 1).

  5. Extending Paul Irish's comprehensive DOM-ready execution

    Way back in March of '09, Paul Irish laid forth a markup-based means of executing JavaScript on page load. I iterated on Paul's method, adding a touch of HTML5 and making use of some built-in Rails magic.

    Published on .

  6. Introduction to HTML5 video - Opera Developer Community

    One of the most exciting new features of HTML5 is the inclusion of the <video> element, which allows developers to include video directly in their pages without the need for any plugin-based solution. This article gives you an introduction to <video> and some of its associated APIs. We look at why native video support in browsers is important, give an overview of the element’s markup, and outline the most important ways in which video can be controlled via JavaScript.

  7. Accessible HTML5 Video with JavaScripted captions - Opera Developer Community

    It’s great that HTML5 allows us to embed video into web pages that can then be displayed directly by browsers, without having to rely on third-party plugins. The elephant in the corner regarding all video — whether it be HTML5 or proprietary — is accessibility. What are conscientious developers to do to provide textual alternatives for those who can’t access the contents of the video?

  8. Fluid Grid System

    A web grid system designed by Joseph Silvashy and New Gold Leaf that allows designers to use the screen real estate on large monitors and retain great design on smaller ones. The Fluid Grid System combines the principals of the typographic grid and a baseline grid into one resolution-independent framework.

  9. HTML 5: The Markup Language

    This specification defines the fifth major version of the HTML vocabulary. It provides the details necessary for producers of HTML content to create conformant documents. By design, it does not define related APIs nor attempt to specify how consumers of HTML content are meant to process documents.