Links

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  1. Nina Makes | Builds | NeXT Computer Replica - Raspberry Pi Case

    This build is a 10cm x 10cm x 10cm replica of the NeXT Computer to house a Raspberry Pi computer. An original NeXT Computer was used by web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee as the first web server and this replica was in homage to that.

    This delightful project by Nina Richards demonstrates how she created a case for a Raspberry Pi that mimics the industrial design of the very first Web server.

  2. USDS’ year-long effort to modernize military relocation site to launch in June - FederalNewsRadio.com

    About 400,000 service members move every year, and let’s just say the technology to support them in this time of stress has been less than adequate. For example, the Defense Personnel [sic] Property System (DPS), run by the U.S. Transportation Command, was reliable only 16 percent of the time, was not mobile friendly and would crash, making it difficult to schedule moves.

    Starting last year and continuing into this summer, the U.S. Digital Service is beginning to relieve some of the stress that comes with moving.

    I’ve worked on aspects of the Defense Personal Property System (DPS) since joining USDS last year. While most of the article focuses on the work my teammates continue pursuing, the article does make mention of our big relaunch of Move.mil.

    Another piece to the project was simplifying the website Move.mil, which [designer and project manager Lauryn] Fantano described as a Wikipedia tool of how to move in the military. USDS worked with the command to remove government speak and answer the questions that families most care about when it comes to moving. USDS relaunched Move.mil in December.

    It’s nice to see folks taking note of the important work we’re doing. If you’d like to help improve government services through better technology, head on over to usds.gov/join.

    💪🏼 🖥 🇺🇸

  3. Google Noto Fonts

    When text is rendered by a computer, sometimes characters are displayed as “tofu.” They are little boxes to indicate your device doesn’t have a font to display the text.

    Google has been developing a font family called Noto, which aims to support all languages with a harmonious look and feel. Noto is Google’s answer to tofu. The name noto is to convey the idea that Google’s goal is to see “no more tofu.” Noto has multiple styles and weights, and is freely available to all.

  4. Jen Simmons on CSS’ display property

    Collecting a few of Jen Simmons’ tweets:

    Learned on today’s CSSWG call—I had a fundamentally out-of-date mental model of how the display property structures its values.

    It’s not display: <value>;. It’s display: <outer-value> <inner-value>;.

    drafts.csswg.org/css-display/#outer-role

    This realization won’t change what I write in my code, but it does change how I think about what I’m writing.

    display: grid; = display: block grid;
    display: flex; = display: block flex;
    

    Also: display: inline grid;

    You can write display: inline-grid;, but that’s actually out of date. It makes more sense to write display: inline grid;

  5. How the Defense Digital Service uses the Design System for a Ruby app | U.S. Web Design System

    The U.S. Web Design System (USWDS) is a library of design and code guidelines to help agencies create trustworthy, accessible, and consistent digital services. The Design System is being used on over one hundred government sites, with an audience of 120 million users. In this 12th post in our series, we sat down with Jason Garber, front-end web developer at the U.S. Digital Service (USDS)’s Defense Digital Service, to talk about his work creating a Ruby gem for the new Move.mil that integrates the Design System into a Ruby on Rails application.

    I was recently interviewed by the team behind the U.S. Web Design System about the uswds-rails Ruby gem I put together. Yay, open source!

  6. WDG Hosts Refresh DC Talk About “The UI of AI”

    Last week, WDG opened our new Clarendon office to a packed audience for Refresh DC. We were thrilled to have Maxim Leyzerovich, Senior Experience Lead at Capital One, discussing “The UI of AI.” With years of UX design experience, Leyzerovich is known for his deep insights about the intersection of design and technology.

    I couldn’t make last week’s Refresh DC meetup, but I’m grateful for the hard work my fellow organizers put into the event, to Maxim for speaking, and to the folks at WDG for hosting and putting together this great recap!

  7. DIY Time Capsule with a Raspberry Pi

    As a Mac user I’ve always used Time Machine for local backups. The only issue is that it requires plugging a drive directly into your machine or buying an Apple Time Capsule. At $200–$400 that’s not a cheap option for NAS backups. So I set out to create my own DIY Time Capsule using a 3TB Hard Drive and a Raspberry Pi.

    A helpful tutorial from Caleb Woods outlining how to use a handful of packages—including netatalk—to create a Time Machine-compatible backup system using a Raspberry Pi.

  8. PostgreSQL Quick Tips: Working With Dates Using EXTRACT function

    A handy tip here from Karol Galanciak demonstrating how to use PostgreSQL’s EXTRACT function:

    We can use EXTRACT and now() functions—the former could be used for extracting the current year from a timestamp and the latter could be used for getting the current time.

    Order.where("EXTRACT(year FROM created_at) = EXTRACT(year FROM now())")
    
  9. plainlanguage.gov

    Plain language makes it easier for the public to read, understand, and use government communications.

    Led by the incomparable Nicole Fenton, the team at 18F recently relaunched plainlanguage.gov, an exceptional website full of writing guidelines, examples, and resources. While the Plain Writing Act of 2010 mandates that government resources be written in clear, concise language, there’s ample evidence that agencies have been slow to update problematic services.

    It’s heartening to see GSA tackle the matter head on.

Looking for more great links organized by year? Browse the archives.