Links

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  1. Introducing USWDS 2.0 | United States Web Design System

    Today, we’re launching U.S. Web Design System 2.0 (USWDS 2.0), a new foundation for the future of our design system. This new version was designed to make it easier for any project to integrate USWDS and use it to support your mission and the needs of your audience.

    USWDS is a library of code, tools, and guidance to help government teams design and build fast, accessible, mobile-friendly government websites backed by user research and modern best practices. USWDS 2.0 is an important update to the design system — it introduces a powerful toolkit of new features to help make creating useful, consistent digital services faster, simpler, and more fun.

    Two years in the making, version 2.0 of the U.S. Web Design System is now live. This is a tremendous update and will be a boon to anyone building digital services for the American people. Congratulations to Dan, Maya, and the rest of the Technology Transformation Services team!

  2. What’s new on iOS 12.2 for Progressive Web Apps – Maximiliano Firtman – Medium

    One year after the first initial support for PWAs on iOS, Apple released iOS 12.2 for iPhone and iPads with what it seems to be the biggest step forward in the last year, addressing the two most annoying problems we’ve been dealing with PWAs: reload effect and OAuth logins.

    Maximiliano Firtman details at great length the updates to Safari available in iOS 12.2. The good, the bad, and the ugly. It’s all covered in this post.

  3. Security Checklist

    An open source checklist of resources designed to improve your online privacy and security. Check things off to keep track as you go.

    This is a great resource, but it highlights the delicate balance of security and user experience that often tips too far toward security at the expense of usability. For those of us in the software design world, it’s more important now than ever to make these technologies more easily accessible to the masses.

  4. My Friend Cindy Li – Ultranormal

    Kevin shares some memories of our dear friend Cindy:

    Cindy brought people together. She was the ultimate connector, and even though she’s gone, the connections she made with all of the people she impacted all over the world will remain. […] She was a vortex of love, and fun, and whimsy, and adventure, and you weren’t just along for the ride, you were an integral part of it.

  5. Removing jQuery from GitHub.com frontend | GitHub Engineering

    The GitHub Engineering team recently completed a gradual transition away from jQuery and wrote in-depth about the experience. There’s a lot of good detail in the post, but I’m particularly fond of this bit:

    As part of our refined approach to building frontend features on GitHub.com, we focused on getting away with regular HTML foundation as much as we could, and only adding JavaScript behaviors as progressive enhancement. As a result, even those web forms and other UI elements that were enhanced using JS would usually also work with JavaScript disabled in the browser. In some cases, we were able to delete certain legacy behaviors altogether instead of having to rewrite them in vanilla JS.

    Stick around through the end of the article for more on how the team is using Custom Elements to enhance the user interface.

  6. Accessibility for Teams

    Put together by 18F’s Accessibility Guild, Accessibility for Teams is…

    A “quick-start” guide for embedding accessibility and inclusive design practices into your team’s workflow.

    In the post announcing the website’s launch, Maya Benari notes:

    Accessibility is a crucial part of government product design. First, it’s the law. Federal agencies face legal consequences when they don’t meet accessibility requirements. Second, it affects us all. Whether you have a motor disability, you sprained your wrist playing dodgeball, you need a building to have a ramp for your wheelchair or stroller, or you literally just have your hands full, we all find ourselves unable to do certain things at different points in our lives. Accessible products are better products for everyone.

    Congratulations to Maya and everyone else on the team for launching this useful accessibility guide!

  7. UTC is Enough for Everyone, Right?

    Programming time, dates, timezones, recurring events, leap seconds… everything is pretty terrible.

    The common refrain in the industry is Just use UTC! Just use UTC! And that’s correct… sort of. But if you’re stuck building software that deals with time, there’s so much more to consider.

    It’s time… to talk about time.

    With this beautifully designed online companion to a series of presentations, Zach Holman goes deep on time as it pertains to computing history.

    Related: The Wikipedia entry for the ISO 8601 standard and RFC 3339 which covers timestamps on the Internet.

  8. Nina Makes | Builds | NeXT Computer Replica - Raspberry Pi Case

    This build is a 10cm x 10cm x 10cm replica of the NeXT Computer to house a Raspberry Pi computer. An original NeXT Computer was used by web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee as the first web server and this replica was in homage to that.

    This delightful project by Nina Richards demonstrates how she created a case for a Raspberry Pi that mimics the industrial design of the very first Web server.

Looking for more great links organized by year? Browse the archives.