Links

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  1. Imagining the Web of Things with Stephanie Rieger and Jonas Sicking | The Web Ahead

    I find myself with IoT talking about progressive enhancement all the time, even though it’s a Web thing, but it makes even more sense. Really, it should be the thing it was designed to be first and then the smarts layered on top.

    Stephanie Rieger on a recent episode of The Web Ahead podcast, speaking with Jen Simmons about designing network-connected physical devices—ahem the Internet of Things—with the philosophy of progressive enhancement baked in. Sure, you could build a Web-connected light switch, but if it isn’t first a well-designed light switch, you’ve missed the mark.

  2. Maintenance, Operational Concerns, and Cost — Chronic Build Failure — Medium

    Jon Daniel on software maintenance:

    I’ve realized that successful applications in an “Enterprise” environment spend far more time in maintenance mode then they do being actively developed. Consumers of your application don’t care that you used some cutting edge framework or state-of-the-art architectural patterns. They just care that it works and continues to work well.

    Jon goes deep on operational concerns and posits:

    Software is not done until it is decommissioned.

    I couldn’t agree more.

  3. Homebrew Website Club DC 2/24/16

    Are you building your own website? Indie reader? Personal publishing web app? Some other digital magic-cloud proxy? If so, come by and join a gathering of people with like-minded interests. Bring your friends that want to start a personal web site. Exchange information, swap ideas, talk shop, or help work on a project.

    Next week’s Homebrew Website Club will be downtown at LivingSocial’s offices near the White House! Come by, share what you’re working on, and hack away at your personal website.

  4. Issue and Pull Request templates

    GitHub added the ability for project maintainers to add issue and pull request templates to projects.

    To add an Issue template to a repository create a file called ISSUE_TEMPLATE in the root directory. A file extension is optional, but Markdown files (.md) are supported. Markdown support makes it easy to add things like headings, links, @-mentions, and task lists to your templates.

    Thinking this will prove quite useful on some of my projects.

  5. Visions of the Future

    Imagination is our window into the future. At NASA/JPL we strive to be bold in advancing the edge of possibility so that someday, with the help of new generations of innovators and explorers, these visions of the future can become a reality. As you look through these images of imaginative travel destinations, remember that you can be an architect of the future.

    This collection of WPA-style travel posters from NASA/JPL appeals to my interests.

  6. The future of loading CSS - JakeArchibald.com

    Chrome’s about to change how it handles <link rel="stylesheet">. This is big news and Jake’s got the rundown:

    The plan is for each <link rel="stylesheet"> to block rendering of subsequent content while the stylesheet loads, but allow the rendering of content before it. The stylesheets load in parallel, but they apply in series. This makes <link rel="stylesheet"> behave similar to <script src="…"></script>.

    It’ll take some getting used to sprinkling <link rel="stylesheet"> throughout a page’s <body>, but the performance benefits (coupled with HTTP/2) will be worth it.

  7. Chunked transfer encoding in Rails (streaming)

    Using the Transfer-Encoding: chunked header, the server will send chunks of the rendered page back to the browser so in the case of Rails, it starts with the layout and sends out the <head> part including assets like js and css.

    Chunked transfer encoding is a great way to improve page performance for the parts of your application that require time-consuming database queries. The Rails-level changes are straightforward, but unfortunately not all Ruby web servers support the feature (looking at you, Puma).

  8. Homebrew Website Club DC

    Are you building your own website? Indie reader? Personal publishing web app? Some other digital magic-cloud proxy? If so, come by and join a gathering of people with like-minded interests. Bring your friends that want to start a personal web site. Exchange information, swap ideas, talk shop, or help work on a project.

    I’m organizing the first of what I hope to be many Homebrew Website Club meetups here in DC. I want to encourage anyone interested in building their own website to attend, regardless of skill level.

    Hope to see you out at Busboys and Poets next Wednesday night!

Looking for more great links organized by year? Browse the archives.